The love magic of gemstones

The love magic of gemstones


From the 11th to the 18th century, there was a belief in the love magic of gemstones. For example, it was believed that someone who looks at a dark red ruby can get drunk without touching wine since red ruby and red wine are related substances. Oriental poets so often compared ruby with wine and girlish lips that an oriental man burning with love, kissing a cold stone, imagined that he was kissed by the hot lips of beauty in response.
The inhabitants of the East thought that the sky-blue turquoise reflected the past clear, cloudless days, the past joy. Hundreds of gold pieces were paid for such a stone, especially if it had the shape of a woman's breast. An Oriental man held this stone before his eyes, turned it in all directions, wanting to extract a unique shine from the gemstone, and emitted a sensitive "ah!" at each turn.
A characteristic feature of Victorian art is sentimentalism. The cross and anchor are symbols of love, faith, hope, and the snake with the tip of its own tail in its mouth is eternal love. Hearts, cupids, and doves are favorite motifs for romantic jewelry.
In the 1830s, plots that remained popular came into fashion. The most popular were pendants in the form of a bird protecting the nest from the attack of a snake, a bird that carries a heart in beak.
An olive branch, or in the form of a forget-me-not.
Jewelry has been inlaid with love messages and engraved with the name of a loved one inside product for more than 200 years. Veiled and open love confessions in jewelry have never gone out of fashion. So, Vladimir Mayakovsky brought jewelry from each trip to his beloved Lila Brik, often with love symbols. His favorite gift was a ring stamped in a circle I LOVE YOU - an endless declaration of love.