The most famous jewelry collections

Famous jewelry collections

The most famous jewelry collections

Collecting jewelry is an aristocratic occupation.
About 300 years ago, the Russian tsars created a fund to store so-called "crown diamonds," consisting partly of imperial regalia, items indicating the greatness of power, partly of jewelry serving as secular ornaments, the right to use only royalty had. The initial information about the royal regalia dates back to December 24, 1719, when Peter the Great adopted a decree according to which crown regalia, as well as the rarest gems and jewelry, separated from numerous items of palace life and everyday life, were isolated as "state-owned things." According to the Decree, a chamber college was organized for their storage, which later became known as the "Diamond Room."
In 1914, with the outbreak of the First World War, it was decided to evacuate the regalia and jewelry from the Diamond Room of the Winter Palace and move them to the Armory of the Moscow Kremlin. In 1920, the State Repository of Valuables of Russia's People's Commissariat of Finance was created. In 1922, the state treasures of the former tsarist Russia - crown diamonds and regalia, which became the basis of the famous Diamond Fund - a unique collection of precious stones and works of jewelry art, were deposited in the Gokhran of Russia.
It is simply necessary for every luxurious woman to visit the Diamond Fund in Moscow to understand what to strive for and which stones are precious.
One of the most excellent private collections of precious stones in pre-revolutionary Russia belonged to the wealthiest family of Felix Yusupov (also known as one of the killers of Grigory Rasputin). His wife, Princess Irina, nee Romanova, collected diamonds and diamonds. She bought them through trusted jewelers at auctions or received them as a gift from her husband and relatives. Prince Yusupov purchased the famous 41-carat Polar Star diamond from Joseph Bonaparte, a relative of Emperor Napoleon. The diamonds received by the princess's collection were taken to Paris for further processing. After the revolution, the entire collection, which included more than a hundred luxurious pairs of miniatures, tiaras, and stories, was taken to Paris, where the Yusupovs settled and lived in a big way - they gave Russian balls and evenings. In the end, the Yusupovs went bankrupt, and the entire jewelry collection was sold out.
Grand Duchess Maria Pavlovna, the wife of Grand Duke Vladimir Alexandrovich, the eldest uncle of Emperor Nicholas II and president of the Imperial Academy of Arts, had an extensive collection of handmade Faberge flowers. At the St. Petersburg exhibition of Faberge works from the collections of the highest personages in 1902, in a showcase with products belonging to the Grand Duchess, an entire shelf thing with precious flowers in crystal vases. According to the inventory of the property of the Grand Duchess's palace, compiled by the Bolsheviks in 1917, there were 33 flowers in her collection: cornflowers, forget-me-nots, cacti, and one dandelion made of gold and diamonds on a golden stem with jade leaves in a vase made of rock crystal.
The morganatic wife of Maria Pavlovna's son Prince Andrey Vladimirovich, the prima of the Imperial ballet Maria Kshesinskaya also owned a massive collection of wonderful artificial flowers made of precious stones.
The collections of the English aristocracy of the early 20th century were distinguished by the exceptional quality of precious stones exported to the UK from the Indian colonies.
The British Queen Alexandra, the wife of Edward the Seventh and the grandmother of Edward the Eighth (the one who abdicated in 1936 to marry the twice-divorced American Wallis Simpson), was also fond of collecting compositions of precious flowers made by Faberge masters. Her collection of more than 20 compositions included sprigs of mountain ash, wild cherry, raspberry and cranberry, field daisies, chrysanthemums, carnations, pansies, as well as a miniature coniferous tree in a pot of jasper. Now this "garden," "grown" at the beginning of the 20th century, is the property of Queen Elizabeth II of England.
Queen Alexandra also collected diamonds. She had three personal jewelers, and once a week, the Queen received them with a special report: which stones had already arrived in Britain, which was expected.
Many of the jewelry made for Queen Alexandra, her grandson Edward the Eighth, presented his precious wife after his marriage to Walis Simpson. The prince gave her a bracelet, and a brooch from Van Cliff made of unique sapphires and diamonds for the wedding. Every event in married life was marked by the gift of jewelry, often having facsimiles of the Duke's handwritten initials and romantic wishes. So, the Duchess's wedding ring was a ring with emeralds and diamonds, with the inscription "From now on we belong to each other." Every time the Duchess of Windsor wore a new piece of jewelry, it made a splash in high society.
The prince ordered real masterpieces for Wallis. For example, in 1936, by his order, the jewelers of the Van Cliff company made a brooch for her in the form of two holly leaves made of diamonds and rubies, where the "invisible frame" technique was used for the first time. Commissioned by the Duchess, the Cartier company created a whole "cat" jewelry collection. Wallis loved jewelry and believed that people should see them. Otherwise, it would be impossible to appreciate them truly. The Duke was so jealous of the Duchess's jewels, in the design of which he took part, that in his will, he ordered them to be dismantled so that they would not go to any other woman.
The Duchess of Windsor's collection was one of the largest and most interesting in the world. Biographers have calculated that she received a jewelry masterpiece as a gift every two weeks of her life with the prince. It is interesting to note that Windsors themselves presented precious stones for the products they ordered.
After the Duchess of Windsor's jewelry sale at the Sotheby's auction in Geneva in 1987, numerous copies of products from her collection with both precious stones and rhinestones appeared on the market.
In the mid-1950s, Hollywood actress Grace Kelly, the Princess of Monaco, loved and collected pearls. Many necklaces "under the throat" in her collection, bracelets in several threads, rings, and earrings. Furthermore, Kelly singled out brooches of all the jewelry except pearl necklaces. She had a whole collection of gold brooches in the form of rose flowers.
Jacqueline Kennedy owned a luxurious collection of jewelry. She started collecting jewelry from her youth. In early June 1953, US President John F. Kennedy proposed to her. He gave her a Van Cleef ring with an emerald surrounded by diamonds. For the wedding, relatives gave Jacqueline a family pearl necklace.
Sometime after the death of President Kennedy, on September 17, 1968, the upcoming wedding of Jacqueline and the Greek tycoon Aristotle Onassis was announced. For the engagement, Onassis presented Jacqueline with a ring with a large ruby surrounded by carat diamonds for $ 1.25 million. As a wedding gift, she received a luxurious set of rubies with diamonds and a gold bracelet in the form of a ram's head. In 1996, an auction of her jewelry was held. The most notable was a 40.42-carat diamond ring called "Lesotho-3" (also a gift from Onassis). The ring was sold for $2.6 million.
Many famous actresses were fond of collecting jewelry. Marlene Diedrich collected Colombian emeralds (she considered the emerald her main stone). All the jewelers in New York vied with each other to offer her jewelry with emeralds. She bought the most outstanding ones right away.
In the collection of Polet Goddard, Charlie Chaplin's wife, there were more than a hundred unique pieces of jewelry. She had an original way of collecting: Goddard received a piece of jewelry from her husband for every role she missed as a consolation.
A unique collection of jewelry was collected by the legendary actress Elizabeth Taylor. She considered jewelry to be an expression of the creative energy of the Lord. Her "romance with the stone" began in early childhood, when she bought a brooch as a gift to her mother. Men instilled a taste for exquisite jewelry, especially Mike Todd, her third husband, a famous Hollywood producer. He gave her a luxurious necklace of rubies and diamonds and a diamond tiara, which she wore to the Academy Award ceremony in 1956. 13 months after the wedding, Todd died in a plane crash.